The impact of opioid substitution therapy on hospitalisation and emergency department presentations of people with opioid use disorders

Project Members: 
image - Sarah Larney
Senior Lecturer
Ph +61 (2) 9385 0333
image - Marian Shanahan
Senior Research Fellow
Ph 02 9385 0333
image - 1313976712 Alison Ritter 005
Director, Drug Policy Modelling Program
Ph 02 9385 0236
image - 1357519930 Natasa Gisev 280
Lecturer
Ph 02 9385 0333
image - Timothy Dobbins Square
Associate Professor
Ph +61 (2) 9385 0333
Project Main Description: 

We will identify a population cohort of people who use opioids, examine hospitalisations and emergency department visits in this group and determine the impacts of opioid substitution therapy on hospitalisation and emergency department visits.

Potential PhD students and post-doctoral fellows should contact Dr Sarah Larney to find out more about becoming involved in this project.

Project Collaborators: External: 

Dr Mark Montebello
South East Sydney Local Health District

Rationale: 

Opioid dependence is the leading contributor to illicit drug disease burden globally and in Australia. People with opioid use disorders have high rates of hospitalisation and emergency department presentations related to opioids and injecting drug use, imposing substantial costs on the health system. Opioid substitution therapy reduces negative health impacts of opioid dependence and injecting drug use, and therefore may be an effective intervention to reduce hospitalisation and emergency department presentation in this group.  

Aims: 
  1. Determine the impacts and cost implications of opioid substitution therapy on hospitalisation and emergency department presentations of people who use opioids

  2. Determine the effectiveness of opioid substitution therapy in reducing mortality of people with opioid use disorders after hospital separation or emergency department presentation. 

Design and Method: 

This is a retrospective observational cohort study using linked administrative data. Data sources include the NSW Pharmaceutical Drugs of Addiction System (PHDAS), the NSW Admitted Patients Data Collection (APDC), the NSW Emergency Department Data Collection (EDDC), and the National Death Index. 

Progress/Update: 

All data linkage has been completed. Data cleaning is underway, along with the development of an algorithm to identify opioid use disorders in hospital and ED data.  

Benefits: 

This project will identify benefits of opioid substitution therapy in relation to hospitalisation and emergency department presentation.  

Project Research Area: 
Drug Type: 
Project Status: 
Current