fbpx Individual level predictors of violent offending and victimisation among polysubstance users | NDARC - National Drug and Alcohol Research Centre

Individual level predictors of violent offending and victimisation among polysubstance users

image - Violence 280
Date Commenced:
08/2011
Expected Date of Completion:
08/2014
Project Supporters:

NDARC PhD Scholarship

Project Members: 
Dr Michelle Tye
Senior Research Fellow, NHMRC Emerging Leader Investigator
image - 1354254213 Sharlene Kaye Square
Dr Sharlene Kaye
Conjoint Senior Lecturer
Associate Professor Fiona Shand
Associate Professor
Project Main Description: 

This project forms the basis for Michelle Tye’s doctoral thesis, and investigates the relationship between individual specific risks (i.e. psychopathology, personality traits, early life trauma) as they relate to the onset and life course of violent offending and victimisation among a sample of community-based polysubstance users. This research offers a detailed examination of the substance use-violence relationship, particularly surrounding violent victimisation (community and domestic settings), which is an area that has been neglected in the drug and alcohol literature.

Aims: 

To describe patterns ofviolent offending and victimisation among polysubstance users; to provide an in-depth examination of the relationship between psychopathology, personality, and early life trauma to understand the onset and life course of violence; and to model the course of reduction or desistance from violent crime, and individual-level factors associated with such desistance. 

Design and Method: 

This thesis work draws from 2 datasets. Firstly, a study of 300 cross-sectional quantitative interviews of community-based regular polysubstance users from the Sydney metro area, and secondly, survey data from the Comorbidity and Trauma Study (CATS). The CATS survey consists of 2000 cross-sectional interviews, and includes 1500 cases (opioid dependent) and 500 controls (non-opioid dependent).

Progress/Update: 

180 from 300 interviews for the first 2 empirical chapters of this doctoral work have been collected to date.

Benefits: 

This research provides important new data regarding the latent relationships mediating the drug-violence association by focusing individual level risks and how they relate to violence, instead of approaching the relationship from the ‘drug use causes violence’ perspective, as is common in the drug and alcohol use literature. Additionally, this research will provide an in-depth examination of the predictors and course of violent victimisation among polysubstance users, as this is an area which has been largely neglected in the drug and alcohol literature. This research may have implications early identification of those most at risk for violent offending and victimisation, and for informing targeted interventions.

Project Research Area: 
Project Status: 
Current